[Skip to Content]

Search results

You searched for: reassure-period
  • Talking to Your Child About Puberty for Parents


    Talking to kids about puberty is an important job for parents, especially because kids often hear about sex and relationships from unreliable sources. Here are some tips.

  • Apnea of Prematurity for Parents


    Apnea of prematurity (AOP) is a condition in which premature infants stop breathing for 15 to 20 seconds during sleep. AOP usually goes away on its own as a baby matures.

  • Nightmares for Parents


    Nightmares aren't totally preventable, but parents can help kids feel better when they have one and ease their transition back to sleep.

  • Communication and Your Newborn for Parents


    From birth, your newborn has been communicating with you. Crying may seem like a foreign language, but soon you'll know what your baby needs - a diaper change, a feeding, or your touch.

  • Communication and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old for Parents


    Your baby is learning to communicate through facial expressions like smiling or frowning as well as crying, squealing, babbling, and laughing. And those sounds are early attempts to speak!

  • Are Detox Diets Safe? for Teens


    The name sounds reassuring - everyone knows that anything toxic is bad for you. But detox diets aren't good for teens. Find out why.

  • When a Parent Is Deployed for Parents


    When a parent is deployed, there are ways to help kids cope and foster the resiliency they need to endure during the separation.

  • Delayed Puberty for Parents


    Puberty usually begins in girls 8-14, and in boys 9-15. If kids pass this normal age range without showing any signs of body changes, it's called delayed puberty.

  • Sleep and Your Preschooler for Parents


    Preschoolers sleep about 11 to 12 hours during each 24-hour period, and it's important to help them develop good habits for getting to sleep.

  • Delayed Puberty for Teens


    Concerned about your growth or development? Puberty can be delayed for several reasons. Luckily, doctors usually can help teens with delayed puberty to develop more normally.